Mull & Iona cont…

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The Iona Abbey has has many reconstructions over the years. Along with many Kings, this is the last resting spot of a number of knights and a Duke of Argyll. Most of the stones that still have recognizable symbolism on them have been relocated to the cloister area in an attempt to shelter them from the elements. Painstaking restoration work is evident everywhere and a small museum with other artifacts is located in what was once the infirmary.

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The alter itself is fairly new. Carved from the beautiful, green Iona marble. A stone found exclusively on this island. The old alter had been chipped away on by people who believed the stone would protect them from drowning.

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It was on the Abbey grounds I planted my Canadian Flag. Here’s to you Dougald – your gr.gr.gr.granddaughter made it back across the sea to see your home.

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The extra bonus of the day was meeting Mary McMillan at the heritage center. She has put me in touch with a local woman who researches the old Mull families and I have hope that I will find which Mcinnis family my Dougald belongs to. She was also able to identify the location his first wife Ann McDonald was buried in, she was the mother of my dads gr.grandfather Neil Mcinnis. We drove through the area on the way back to Oban. The feeling of being so close to her was amazing.

Mother nature treated us for braving the horrible weather on the trip back to the Oban ferry. All the rain produced an amazing display of waterfalls just teaming down the hills. It was a very rare sighting, and the locals were happy because they had actually been dealing with drought conditions, not having seen rain in several weeks. We finished up the day with a HUGE feed of local seafood. Somehow it was very fitting.

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